hurrengoa
plans for those with no plans    Presenting a book of poetry is something like a loser’s birthday party. In itself, presenting a book of poetry is a poetic event. For the author of Haciendo planes, Karmelo Iribarren, at least, everyone being there once again to celebrate the
publication on his next work three years after the previous one is something to celebrate in itself. Above all, being there.

Poet Karmelo has accepted that half-jokingly and in all seriousness. He writes mostly about time and weather, time which lasts and the weather. “Time which goes by and the weather there is”. And, as Harkaitz Cano –the other poet he brought with him to present the book– said: “He writes to us about the four seasons of the year in this new work: autumn, autumn, autumn and autumn”, although the ironic sleeve on the book tells us the opposite.

Karmelo read us some of the poems from his new book. And told us where those poems had come from. But not with too much information. Those of us in his fan club know that he always writes the same poems. Or almost always. As the poet says, “Because life itself is made up of three or four things”. There were questions and comments after the reading. All of a sudden, listening to people talk about poetry seemed anachronistic and modern to me. Both things at the same time. The eternal subject of poems and poetry. Karmelo finished the
meeting off with his usual economy for those of us who didn’t have anything better to do. “Poetry is what happens when a poem burns”. KO. As Itziar, who had no better plan than going to the presentation of a book said, “full stop, the end and a blank sheet.”


Horizon

It’s logic
for colours to come out
right at the end:
they spend the day lying



The start and ends

love and nightmares
are like each other
when it comes to mixing up sheets,
only then,
at the start of love



Corridors

Corridors in houses are dramatic places.
Sometimes
-mostly in the morning,
before you go to work–
couples who have stopped loving each other
come across each other there,
face to face,
and then they find it hard
not to look each other in the eye.