paperpapers
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del caminar sobre hielo

werner herzog

This is one of the most interesting publishers we’ve come across recently. When Werner Herzog found out that his friend Lotte Eisner was seriously ill in Paris, he left Munich to go to Paris. On foot. This travel book is hallucinating and passionate. Solitude and fever brought on by rough weather are what this book, which is as energetic as it is small, has to offer us.

hurrengoa

gaueko zaintzailea

julen belamuno

In The balde we don’t write book critiques. Not because we’re against criticisms, but because we don’t know how to and we don’t have the space for it. But we liked the book we’re talking about for various reasons. We were struck by the story of a man who is about to lose his job after working as a caretaker on an industrial estate for 28 years. There are hardly any events in this novel. It isn’t action in the narrative which makes you carry on. But, as you read, you want to keep the night watchman company: he keeps your curiosity alive with his memories and the decisions he’s taken throughout his life. It reminded us of Patrick Suskind’s Die Taube (The Dove).

hurrengoa

independentzia helburu

andoni olariaga, imanol galfarsoro, unai apaolaza jule goikoetxea.

First up, a confession. We haven’t read the whole book. In other words, we’ve skipped a few bits. But when we picked it up, we thought we were going to high-jump from the first page to the last, and that didn’t happen. The book’s title makes it very clear what it’s about: independence as a goal. Leaving to one side the in-breeding which is so common amongst intellectuals, in this book they’ve written in an understandable, easy-to-read way. And that’s something to be grateful for: it’s a book which wants to encourage readers to think about independence.

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dandole vueltas

frederik peeters

In this volume of comics, Peeters, who we so much admire, brings together his work for magazines over recent years. At the start of the book he talks about the reason for writing things: “Really, I could have revised some of these stories to stop them from looking so aged, but, as my grandfather used to say, things have to be accepted up to the last consequences. And you should know that my grandfather committed suicide. One of this table’s legs may be shorter than the others, but if I shortened the others to get a balance, it wouldn’t be the same table.” Enjoy it.